Jobs on Ferries
These include ticket sales, maintenance personnel, human resources people,
purchasing agents, bookkeepers, and clerical help. The variety of shoreside positions
will depend on the size of the ferry company.

Ferry employment wages will depend on vessel size, company policies, hours per week
of work, and regularity of work. Wages will also depend on the grade of Coast Guard
license, limits of tonnage, limits of horsepower, and knowledge of a sound, bay, inlet or
other body of water or feature of a body of water. Regional offices of state departments
of labor, listed below, should have resources for labor law in a particular state.

Good luck and smooth sailing!





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Maritime Jobs on Ferry Boats
Maritime Jobs - Marine Jobs - Deckhands - Tankermen - Able Seaman - Maritime Jobs - Deck Engine - Employment in the Maritime
Industry - Work on Ships - Yachts - Tugboats - Cruise Ships
An attractive aspect of working on
ferries, water taxies, shuttles and
commuter boats is that the work
doesn’t require being away from
home for months on end. Ferry boat
job prospects will depend on your
Coast Guard license and familiarity
with a specific body of water for
captain and mate position
candidates.
Maritime IQ
What is a
naval architect ?
Chief engineers, designated duty
engineers (DDEs), oilers, QMEDs
(qualified members of the engine
department) and other engine
department positions will have
opportunities that tie in their
knowledge of certain plants, such as
General Motors, BW, or Fairbanks
Morse.

Jobs with Ferry, water taxi, shuttle
and commuter boat companies
include captains, mates, able
seamen, deckhands, chief
engineers, assistant engineers,
QMED (qualified members of the
engine department), ticket collectors.
Ferry, water taxi, shuttle and
commuter boat companies also look
for job candidates for their shoreside
positions.
Alert the Media!
There are new openings in
the ferry industry, including
AB Seaman, Reservation
Agent, Port Engineer and
others. To learn more, go to

ferryjobs.net
The ferry industry is dynamic, with a broad range of jobs from deck and engine
officers, deckhands, AB seamen and other traditional maritime employees. See
Vineyard Fast Ferry Opportunites at their website. With small ferry operations, many
jobs are already filled by spring. Larger operations tend to hire year round.
The ferry and water taxi  industry is nice because you can stay close to home. But
guess what? Everyone out there has learned that little secret. Why be stuck on some
river barge for 28 days when you can go home to have dinner or a late night snack
with your family at the end of the day?
One of the reasons that mariners who are in it for the long haul are hesitant about
the ferry industry is that the employment season is short. Many ferry and fast ferry
operators count on tourist and vacation traffic to stay in business. When those
people pack up and go home after Labor Day, ferry operations slow down and with
that the demand for employees. That also means competing with students who don't
mind non-union operations. Water taxis are somewhat more stable as employment
because the stream of passengers from commuters doesn't abate in September.
Ferry operations have tried to re-invent themselves with things like sightseeing tours,
dinner cruises, booze cruises, music on the bay, etc., but that's getting into the niche
of the dinner cruise market. The dinner cruise sector is not having any picnic of its
own though, given the downturn in corporate outings, lavish weddings, etc.
Fuel prices have been a bruiser to this industry as they have to others, but another
growing trend that might not bode well is that companies are streamlining labor
forces and setting out to accomplish more with less manpower. Some operations
are cutting back on discretionary overtime for its labor forces. Don't be demoralized.
These things don't mean that there will no longer be jobs in this area. It just means
that those jobs might be more difficult and for some people, not worth the appeal of
staying close to home to avoid the grind of four weeks on or two weeks on.