Built by Halter Marine in Mississippi, the NOAA hydrographic survey vessel Thomas
Jefferson
originally started its career as a naval vessel before joining the NOAA fleet.
It measures 208 feet in length, with a beam of 45 feet and draft of 14 feet, and a
displacement of 2,000 tons. Powered by a General Motors EMD12-645F7B
turbocharged main engine and a Detroit 6V92N cruising engine, a single screw
provides a top speed of 14 knots and a sustained speed of 12 knots. It has a range of
22,100 miles and accommodations for 34 crew and 4 scientists, berthing them in
single (8), double (15) and four-person staterooms. A recent employment opportunity
with the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration appears below.
Latest Postings


Naval Architect  U.S. Navy - Various Locations

Marine Electrician  Glacier Fish Company

Captain  Kwajalein Range Services

Per Diem Educator  Intrepid Sea Air & Space Museum

Various Deck/Engine  Liberty Maritime

Event Manager Hornblower Cruises and Events

Instructor American Bureau of Shipping

Deckhand U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Seasonal Visitor Services Associate South Street Seaport Museum

Marine Manager  SEACOR Holdings

Laborer BAE Systems

Buyer  Stolt-Nielsen

Environmental Officer Royal Caribbean Cruise Line

Maritime Transportation Specialist U.S. Coast Guard

Laborer Port of Gulfport

Welder/Fabricators, Pipefitters Derecktor Shipyards

Deck & Engine - Various Tidewater Marine

Megayacht & Superyacht Crew Various Privately Owned Vessels

Sailing Instructor Offshore Sailing School

Watch Officers - Deck and Engine  California Maritime Academy

Events Producer  The Queen Mary

Cruise Consultant Silversea

Supplemental Longshoremen  Matson Navigation

Deck/Engine Positions  Seabulk

Various Shoreside Positions  Bollinger Shipyards

Yacht Broker  Denison Yacht Sales

Ordinary  Seaman  Cape May - Lewes Ferry














d
New Postings
Maritime Jobs - Marine Jobs - Deckhands - Tankermen - Able Seaman - Maritime Jobs - Deck Engine - Employment in the Maritime
Industry - Work on Ships - Yachts - Tugboats - Cruise Ships
A new book called So You Want to
Work on a Boat provides an
overview of working in the
maritime industry. It's a valuable
resource filled with information
about finding employers, maritime
training and education, writing
cover letters, resumes, and
preparing for interviews. The book
is even-handed and does a good
job of neither encouraging or
discouraging entering this difficult
field. It's basically the simple facts
and issues about the industry.
The link above will take you to
Tugboat Jobs, which features a
few pages of the book for
sampling.
Free e-Course...

Operational Aspects of
Ballast Water
Management

















The International Maritime
Organization, or IMO,
explains that invasive
species are one of the four
greatest threats to the
world's oceans. The
GEF-UNDP-IMO GloBallast
Partnerships Programme
worked together with the
Global Industry Alliance
(GIA) to create this dynamic
e-learning platform about
Operational aspects of
Ballast Water Management.










The Lionfish is a species
that is indigenous to the
Pacific Ocean. It is one of
the recognized invasive
species of fish that have
caught the attention of
researchers.
August 1, 2017 - IMO awards
Houston Pilots for Bravery at Sea
The International Maritime
Organization National recognized
two Houston ship pilots with the
2017 IMO Award for Exceptional
Bravery at Sea. They had played a
role in averting a tragic outcome to
an allision between their ship and
mooring dolphins. Flames
erupted after the incident and
created a curtain of burning fuel.
The pilots, Captain Michael G.
McGee and Captain Michael C.
Phillips, demonstrated  
decisiveness, dedication and
ship-handling expertise.

Read more at the
IMO website